The Count of Monte Cristo

Donde el joven Dantés reporta sobre el viaje, la muerte del capitán del barco y el regreso. Del clásico francés The Count of Monte Cristo, de Alexandre Dumas [père]    
… "Why, you see, Edmond," replied the owner, who appeared more comforted at every moment, "we are all mortal, and the old must make way for the young. If not, why, there would be no promotion; and since you assure me that the cargo—"
"Is all safe and sound, M. Morrel, take my word for it; and I advise you not to take 25,000 francs for the profits of the voyage."
Then, as they were just passing the Round Tower, the young man shouted: "Stand by there to lower the topsails and jib; gather the spanker!"
The order was executed as promptly as it would have been on board a man-of-war.
"Let go—and lower them!" At this last command all the sails were lowered, and the vessel moved almost imperceptibly onwards.
"Now, if you will come on board, M. Morrel," said Dantès, observing the owner's impatience, "here is your supercargo, M. Danglars, coming out of his cabin, who will furnish you with every particular. As for me, I must look after the anchoring, and dress the ship in mourning."


The owner did not wait for a second invitation. He seized a rope which Dantès flung to him, and with an activity that would have done credit to a sailor, climbed up the side of the ship, while the young man, going to his task, left the conversation to Danglars, who now came towards the owner. He was a man of twenty-five or twenty-six years of age, of unprepossessing countenance, obsequious to his superiors, insolent to his subordinates; and this, in addition to his position as responsible agent on board, which is always intolerable to the sailors, made him as much disliked by the crew as Edmond Dantès was beloved by them.
"Well, M. Morrel," said Danglars, "you have heard of the misfortune that has happened to us?"
"Yes—yes: poor Captain Leclere! He was a brave and an honest man."
"And a first-rate seaman, one who had seen long and honorable service, as became a man charged with the interests of a house so important as that of Morrel & Son," replied Danglars.
"But," replied the owner, glancing after Dantès, who was watching the anchoring of his vessel, "it seems to me that a sailor needs not be so old as you say, Danglars, to understand his business, for our friend Edmond seems to understand it thoroughly, and not to require instruction from any one."
"Yes," said Danglars, darting at Edmond a look gleaming with hate. "Yes, he is young, and youth is invariably self-confident. Scarcely was the captain's breath out of his body when he assumed the command without consulting anyone, and he caused us to lose a day and a half at the Island of Elba, instead of making for Marseilles direct."
"As to taking command of the vessel," replied Morrel, "that was his duty as captain's mate; as to losing a day and a half off the Island of Elba, he was wrong, unless the vessel needed repairs."
"The vessel was in as good condition as I am, and as, I hope you are, M. Morrel, and this day and a half was lost from pure impulse, for the pleasure of going ashore, and nothing else."
"Dantès," said the shipowner, turning towards the young man, "come this way!"
"In a moment, sir," answered Dantès, "and I'm with you." Then calling to the crew, he said—"Let go!"
The anchor was instantly dropped, and the chain ran rattling through the port-hole. Dantès continued at his post in spite of the presence of the pilot, until this manœuvre was completed… (The Count of Monte Cristo de Alexandre Dumas [père], in easier English)     
 
Vocabulario
man-of-war: a ship built for combat purposes.
El libro
The Count of Monte Cristo fue completada en 1844 y es uno de los trabajos más populares de Alejandro Dumas. La historia se centra alrededor de un hombre que es injustamente mandado a la cárcel, escapa, se convierte en millonario y comienza su venganza. La historia tiene lugar durante la restauración de los Borbones, cuando Napoleón retorna al poder después del exilio.
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Recursos
The Count of Monte Cristo, to read from Project Gutenberg.

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